Help

Looking for help for yourself or a friend? Choose one of the two paths below!

Choose...

What help looks like and why it is important

You never have to feel alone! There are lots of people who care and want to help, with lots of choices for support, treatment, and self-care. Watch a video or scroll down to learn more.

Talk to Someone

It really is OK not to feel OK. Talking about what you’re experiencing is a big step to feeling better. You might be surprised at the kind of support you’ll get when reaching out. Maybe bring up something you saw or did recently. You don’t have to come right out with the tougher stuff.

Try talking or texting with a trusted friend or adult. Here are some starters:

I haven’t felt myself lately and I’m not sure if I should do anything – do you have a minute?

I’m worried about stuff that’s going on right now. Can I share with you?                                   

If you prefer to have a conversation anonymously, try one of these 24/7/365 options:

 

Try Therapy

It is very common for people to talk to a therapist to help with mental health. When considering therapy (sometimes called “counseling”), the sooner you get started the better. Talk therapy works great and is now more flexible than ever – with options to talk in person, on a smartphone, or even by texting. Therapists help with all sorts of issues, including stress, relationships, anxiety, depression, or whatever’s on your mind.

Some things to think about:

  • Choose a therapist you feel comfortable sharing with, someone who really gets you.
  • Ask lots of questions – remember, your therapist is there for you.
  • Be honest! It’s important to be direct and open so they can help.
  • Therapy can be one-on-one, in a group, with a family, or with a partner.
  • A school counselor can help connect you to mental health services.
  • Go with your gut – if you think therapy may help but aren’t sure, why not try it!

Self-Care

Being a teen can be really hard and stressful. Taking care of yourself is super important! What works best looks different for everyone, but plenty of sleep, water, and support are all key to good mental health. Your well-being is a top priority – make time for things you really enjoy.

Here are some ideas for positive self-care:

  • Listen to your favorite music
  • Write, journal, draw, color, or paint
  • Go for a walk, run, or hit the gym
  • Practice deep breathing (video below!)
  • Hang out with people who make you laugh
  • Go outside and enjoy nature
  • Take a break from news and social media
  • Try yoga, meditation, and relax
  • Join a club, try a sport, or start a hobby
  • Stay connected and use your support system

Stay positive! Be kind to yourself. Focus on the present…the power of optimism is amazing, but it takes time and practice for many of us.

"I go to therapy. It's just one of the most important things — to get to know yourself. Not saying everyone in the world has to do it, but I do think that it's helped me understand myself and my childhood a lot better.”

– Selena Gomez

Listen to an interview with Selena on authenticity

How to Support Someone Else

It’s not always easy to ask someone about their mental health, but it’s a great way to show you care. Just listening and being there can make a huge difference in your friend’s life. Watch a video or scroll down to learn more.

Start a Conversation

Good friends have each other’s back. If you ever feel concerned about someone, talk to them! It’s OK to start with small talk. Try not to assume or judge. It can feel scary at first to open up about mental health, maybe for both of you. Ask questions and make it clear that you are on their team.

Try texting or talking to your friend and see how it goes. Here are some starters:

I’ve noticed you’re [sleeping more, eating less, etc.], is everything OK?

You know I’m always here for you. Want to talk about anything?

If you wonder if someone is considering suicide, ask them about it directly when other people are not around. Say something like, “do you ever consider suicide?” Talking about suicide directly is proven to help and shows you care and that your friend is not alone.

If you’re uncomfortable asking about what’s going on but are worried, find someone else to take the lead in talking with your friend about their mental health – like a trusted adult or another friend.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lCpXz3XG7w&list=PLdSSKSOSBh4l56j7S7HxdZPTmO5iqvKCe&index=22

Be Supportive

Friends look out for each other and stick together. Keep in mind that your friend might not be ready to talk about what they’re going through or simply may not want your help right now. Try not to force the issue. Just do your best to be there and support your friend. Hang out, invite them to do something, or make an effort to say nice things. Being there for them is what matters most.

Is there anything I can do to help?

I know of some free mental health resources. Want me to send you any?

Let your friend know it’s OK to text or call anytime if there is something they need or want to talk about. Allow them to share their feelings, experiences, or whatever’s on their mind.

Consider sharing these 24/7/365 resources with your friend:

teens-with-smartphone-2021-04-20-22-04-24-utc

Check In Often

Being a friend means being there, even when the going gets tough. When someone is experiencing mental health issues, having positive people staying involved can really help with their recovery. Check-in with your friend on a regular basis.

Trust your instincts – go ahead and call or text if you think they need a pick-me-up or someone to talk to. If you notice something concerning on social, speak up and ask about it. Don’t think twice about getting someone else involved to help if you think it’s needed.

Keep inviting your friend to do things with you and others, even if they may not always seem interested. They’ll likely appreciate you checking in and including them. Showing someone you care is a big deal. Be positive and stay supportive!

What help looks like and why it is important

You never have to feel alone! There are lots of people who care and want to help, with lots of choices for support, treatment, and self-care. Watch a video or scroll down to learn more.

Talk to Someone

It really is OK not to feel OK. Talking about what you’re experiencing is a big step to feeling better. You might be surprised at the kind of support you’ll get when reaching out. Maybe bring up something you saw or did recently. You don’t have to come right out with the tougher stuff.

Try talking or texting with a trusted friend or adult. Here are some starters:

I haven’t felt myself lately and I’m not sure if I should do anything – do you have a minute?

I’m worried about stuff that’s going on right now. Can I share with you?                                   

If you prefer to have a conversation anonymously, try one of these 24/7/365 options:

 

Try Therapy

It is very common for people to talk to a therapist to help with mental health. When considering therapy (sometimes called “counseling”), the sooner you get started the better. Talk therapy works great and is now more flexible than ever – with options to talk in person, on a smartphone, or even by texting. Therapists help with all sorts of issues, including stress, relationships, anxiety, depression, or whatever’s on your mind.

Some things to think about:

  • Choose a therapist you feel comfortable sharing with, someone who really gets you.
  • Ask lots of questions – remember, your therapist is there for you.
  • Be honest! It’s important to be direct and open so they can help.
  • Therapy can be one-on-one, in a group, with a family, or with a partner.
  • A school counselor can help connect you to mental health services.
  • Go with your gut – if you think therapy may help but aren’t sure, why not try it!

Self-Care

Being a teen can be really hard and stressful. Taking care of yourself is super important! What works best looks different for everyone, but plenty of sleep, water, and support are all key to good mental health. Your well-being is a top priority – make time for things you really enjoy.

Here are some ideas for positive self-care:

  • Listen to your favorite music
  • Write, journal, draw, color, or paint
  • Go for a walk, run, or hit the gym
  • Practice deep breathing (video below!)
  • Hang out with people who make you laugh
  • Go outside and enjoy nature
  • Take a break from news and social media
  • Try yoga, meditation, and relax
  • Join a club, try a sport, or start a hobby
  • Stay connected and use your support system

Stay positive! Be kind to yourself. Focus on the present…the power of optimism is amazing, but it takes time and practice for many of us.

"I go to therapy. It's just one of the most important things — to get to know yourself. Not saying everyone in the world has to do it, but I do think that it's helped me understand myself and my childhood a lot better.”

– Selena Gomez

Listen to an interview with Selena on authenticity

How to Support Someone Else

It’s not always easy to ask someone about their mental health, but it’s a great way to show you care. Just listening and being there can make a huge difference in your friend’s life. Watch a video or scroll down to learn more.

Start a Conversation

Good friends have each other’s back. If you ever feel concerned about someone, talk to them! It’s OK to start with small talk. Try not to assume or judge. It can feel scary at first to open up about mental health, maybe for both of you. Ask questions and make it clear that you are on their team.

Try texting or talking to your friend and see how it goes. Here are some starters:

I’ve noticed you’re [sleeping more, eating less, etc.], is everything OK?

You know I’m always here for you. Want to talk about anything?

If you wonder if someone is considering suicide, ask them about it directly when other people are not around. Say something like, “do you ever consider suicide?” Talking about suicide directly is proven to help and shows you care and that your friend is not alone.

If you’re uncomfortable asking about what’s going on but are worried, find someone else to take the lead in talking with your friend about their mental health – like a trusted adult or another friend.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lCpXz3XG7w&list=PLdSSKSOSBh4l56j7S7HxdZPTmO5iqvKCe&index=22

Be Supportive

Friends look out for each other and stick together. Keep in mind that your friend might not be ready to talk about what they’re going through or simply may not want your help right now. Try not to force the issue. Just do your best to be there and support your friend. Hang out, invite them to do something, or make an effort to say nice things. Being there for them is what matters most.

Is there anything I can do to help?

I know of some free mental health resources. Want me to send you any?

Let your friend know it’s OK to text or call anytime if there is something they need or want to talk about. Allow them to share their feelings, experiences, or whatever’s on their mind.

Consider sharing these 24/7/365 resources with your friend:

teens-with-smartphone-2021-04-20-22-04-24-utc

Check In Often

Being a friend means being there, even when the going gets tough. When someone is experiencing mental health issues, having positive people staying involved can really help with their recovery. Check-in with your friend on a regular basis.

Trust your instincts – go ahead and call or text if you think they need a pick-me-up or someone to talk to. If you notice something concerning on social, speak up and ask about it. Don’t think twice about getting someone else involved to help if you think it’s needed.

Keep inviting your friend to do things with you and others, even if they may not always seem interested. They’ll likely appreciate you checking in and including them. Showing someone you care is a big deal. Be positive and stay supportive!

Please select an option above.